Academics

2022 Summer Assignments

Mathematics

American mathematician William Paul Thurston says “ Mathematics is not about numbers, equations, computations, or algorithms: it is about understanding.” To deepen your “understanding,” all students are required to complete summer math work in DeltaMath (class of 2023 thru class of 2027)

In Delta Math, problems are randomized, allowing students multiple opportunities to get the practice and feedback they need on the road to content mastery and retention. The information covered in your summer work reviews key math concepts that you have learned in your 2021-2022 math class. The objective here is for each student to enter his math class in 2022-2023 with prior math content and skills mastered and retained. To this end, make sure you are enrolled in and complete the Delta Math assignment that matches the math course in which you are enrolled for the 2022-2023 academic year (see the codes below). You are able to view your 2022-2023 courses in MyPrep under the “course request” tab.  Note: Though labeled “course request” by our SIS, this is the math course in which you have achieved the grade standard to enroll (classes of 2023, 2024, and 2025) or in which you have been placed via the placement test and application packet rubric (classes of 2026 and 2027).

Current students, you enrolled in DeltaMath during your 2021-2022 math class before exams. If you did not enroll at that time or are new to St Augustine Prep (class of 2027, class of 2026, transfer students) please log on to deltamath.com, click the “For Students” tab, and select the “Register” tab. Choose the course code from the list below that matches the math class you are enrolled in for the 2022-2023 school year. Finally, select the Register with Google option. You may register immediately but the assignment will not be available to work on until July 1.

Your summer math work opens on July 1 and is due by August 21, 2022. The summer assignment will be worth two homework grades, and every teacher will be quizzing all students on the summer work material during the first week of school. Teachers will not accept late work for any homework credit. Students enrolled in summer online Honors Geometry or summer online Honors Precalculus are required to complete the appropriate DeltaMath assignment (i.e. the assignment for the 2022-2023 course in which you are enrolled in MyPrep).

If you have any questions regarding DeltaMath, please feel free to reach out to Mr. Wooster at Mr.Wooster@hermits.com. If you have any questions regarding math placement, please feel free to reach out to Mrs. McHugh at mrs.mchugh@hermits.com.




  • AP Calc AB – FC85-A22E
  • AP Calc BC – 7D9R-A2AF
  • AP Stat – 47TQ-9A3H
  • Applications of Calculus – 2EE3-PY2B
  • CP Algebra 2 – 7G9Y-X2AV
  • CP Geometry – V7X7-4L9Y
  • CP Pre-Calc – KB64-4ZZ2
  • CP Stat – J57N-993T
  • Honors Algebra 2 – XB9H-8T6T
  • Honors Calculus – B87V-M99H
  • Honors Geometry – 3DZ7-WF84
  • Honors Pre-Calculus – L47T-7DL6


  • Students entering Honors Geometry – 3DZ7-WF84
  • Students entering CP Geometry – V7X7-4L9Y
  • Students entering Honors Alg. 1 – 3R5H-J4RT
  • Students entering CP Alg. 1 – AS68-XL6X

  • Students entering Alg. 1 – AS68-XL6X
  • Students entering Pre-Alg. – VB36-L6JE


Literature



*A hard copy (typed, not handwritten) of this assignment is due on Orientation Day, August 29, 2022. 

Read:

“Thank you, Ma’am” by Langston Hughes. You can read it here. 

“Examination Day” by Henry Slesar. You can read it here.

Writing assignment:

How does the author of the story use conflict to develop the theme? Answer this question for each of the two stories in separate short essays. Each response should be 2-3 paragraphs. Use specific quotes from the stories to support your claim. 


*A hard copy (typed, not handwritten) of this assignment is due on Orientation Day, August 30, 2022.

Read:

“The Paper Menagerie” by Ken Liu. You can read it here.

“Us & Them” by David Sedaris. You can read it here.

Writing assignment:

How does the author of the story use conflict to develop the theme? Answer this question for each of the two stories in separate short essays. Each response should be 2-3 paragraphs. Incorporate quotes from the stories in order to support your claim.

*A hard copy (typed, not handwritten) of this assignment is due on Orientation Day, August 30, 2022. 

Read:

“The Paper Menagerie” by Ken Liu. You can read it here.

“Us & Them” by David Sedaris. You can read it here.

“Valediction” by Sherman Alexie. You can read it here

Writing assignment:

How does the author of the story use conflict to develop the theme? Answer this question for each of the three stories in separate short essays. Each response should be 2-3 paragraphs. Incorporate quotes from the stories in order to support your claim. 

A hard copy (typed, not handwritten) of this assignment is due on Orientation Day, August 31, 2022. 

Read:

“The Man in the Black Suit” by Stephen King.  You can read it here. 

“Everything That Rises Must Converge” by Flannery O’Connor. You can read it  here. 

Then do as follows. 

  1. Give each story a grade. You do not need to rationalize your grade in any way. It simply gets the grade YOU think it deserves. 
  2. Write at least three paragraphs for ONE of the stories. 
    1. Explain what was done right or wrong according to the grade you gave it. (Yes, be brave. Dare to tell a published author how to do their job. We won’t tell anyone. Promise! Also; tone has passed beyond the veil, and the third has heard worse than you can offer.)
    2. How could the author have improved upon the story, or in what way did it approach perfection?
    3. Share anything else noteworthy about your chosen texts. Why did this thing worthy of note strike the chord it did? (Sorry to mix metaphors there.)

A hard copy (typed, not handwritten) of this assignment is due on Orientation Day, August 31, 2022. 

Read:

“The Man in the Black Suit” by Stephen King.  You can read it here. 

“Everything That Rises Must Converge” by Flannery O’Connor. 

  You can read it  here. 

“The Hanging Stranger” by Phillip K. Dick. You can read it here. 

Then do as follows. 

  1. Give each story a grade. You do not need to rationalize your grade to me in any way. It simply gets the grade YOU think it deserves. 
  2. Write at least three paragraphs EACH for two of the stories
    1. Explain what was done right or wrong according to the grade you gave it. (Yes, be brave. Dare to tell a published author how to do their job. I won’t tell anyone. Promise! Also; two have passed beyond the veil, and the third has heard worse than you can offer.)
    2. How could the author have improved upon the story, or in what way did it approach perfection?
    3. Share anything else noteworthy about your chosen texts. Why did this thing worthy of note strike the chord it did? (Sorry to mix metaphors there.)

A hard copy (typed, not handwritten) of this assignment is due on Orientation Day, September 1. 

Read:

“The Lady with the Dog” by Anton Checkhov. You can read it here

“A Temporary Matter” by Jhumpa Lahiri. You can read it here

Then do as follows. 

  1. Give each story a grade. You do not need to rationalize your grade to us in any way. It simply gets the grade YOU think it deserves. 
  2. Write at least three well constructed paragraphs for ONE of the pieces. 
    1. Explain what was done right or wrong according to the grade you gave it. (Yes, be brave. Dare to tell a published author how to do their job. We won’t tell anyone. Promise! Also; one has passed beyond the veil, and the other has heard worse than you can offer.
    2. How could the author have improved upon the story, or in what way did it approach perfection?
    3. Share anything else noteworthy about your chosen texts. Why did this thing worthy of note strike the chord it did? (Sorry to mix metaphors there.)

 

A hard copy (typed, not handwritten) of this assignment is due on Orientation Day, September 1. 

Read:

“The Lady with the Dog” by Anton Checkhov. You can read it here

“A Temporary Matter” by Jhumpa Lahiri. You can read it here

“The Library of Babel” by Jorge Luis Borges. You can read it here. 

Then do as follows. 

  1. Give each story a grade. You do not need to rationalize your grade to us in any way. It simply gets the grade YOU think it deserves.
  2. Write at least three paragraphs EACH for two of the pieces. 
    1. Explain what was done right or wrong according to the grade you gave it. (Yes, be brave. Dare to tell a published author how to do their job. We won’t tell anyone. Promise! Also; two have passed beyond the veil, and the third has heard worse than you can offer.
    2. How could the author have improved upon the story, or in what way did it approach perfection?
    3. Share anything else noteworthy about your chosen texts. Why did this thing worthy of note strike the chord it did? (Sorry to mix metaphors there.)

 

A hard copy (typed, not handwritten) of this assignment is due on Orientation Day, September 1. 

Read:

“A Very Old Man with Enormous Wings” by Gabriel Garcia Marquez. You can read it here.

“Go Gentle into that Good Night” by Roger Ebert. You can read it here.

Written Assignment (1-2 pages, Times New Roman, size 12, double spaced):

Incorporate your responses to the following questions in a well-crafted reflection.

Which of these pieces appeals to you more? Do you generally prefer to read fiction or nonfiction? Why? Cite specifics from both pieces that illustrate what you like and do not like about each. What connections can you make between the two pieces?

A hard copy (typed, not handwritten) of this assignment is due on Orientation Day, September 1

Read from Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales:

“The Prologue”         

“The Nun’s Priest’s Tale”   

“The Pardoner’s Tale”

Respond thoughtfully to the following 2 questions.

  1. Choose any character from “The Prologue” and relate this character to yourself. Explain the connections in detail. 
  2. Compare or contrast “The Nun’s Priest’s Tale” and “The Pardoner’s Tale” relative to the theme of the story.